AVS Discussions
  Go Down

TV: From the 1950s to today

Barry

  • *****
  • 287
TV: From the 1950s to today
« on: June 01, 2019, 12:25:15 PM »
 As I sat down to watch the “zenith” of my home theatre, I began to think of when this adventure began. 
 
The first TV I had viewed was a 1950s Dumont, (bought way before I was around) that my family had kept for a couple of decades. It was a ten inch “round” TV, built into a  piece of furniture that also had a AM/FM radio and a record player. I was told it cost $1000 in 1950s money (This was way before my time!) Believe or not, TV were originally NOT just sold in appliance shops but in furniture stores!
 
The TV did not have a “dial” to change channel. You rotated a “tuner” and there was a second dial for “fine tuning.” There were also knobs on the front to adjust the horizontal and vertical.
 
 For the next few years the evolution of TV was  mostly seen in growing screen size. When we got a 15 incher it came with an early remote. The remote used a “bell” sound to change the channels and worked very badly.
 
Our neighbors, about 1965, got a 25 inch color TV. Added to the knobs were ones for color and hue that had to be adjusted all the time.  Son at this time was realising small TV's to watch lying down.
 
In 1975 or so, the Betamax VCR came out.  The Betamax had a TV tuner built in and an external timer, making it useful for home use. (Video cassettes had previously been released).  I recall it being about $1,000 and takes $25.  Originally it taped one hour, but eventually the Betas could tape three hours at a slower speed and longer tapes. It attached to the TV using the antenna input.
 
About 1978 General Electric released a “computerized” VIR system, as I recall. This automatically tuned TVs, eventually leading to the removal of those color and horizontal and vertical knobs.
 
About 1980, a cheaper and more universal VCR system, VHS was introduced. And after the Supreme Court ruled VCRs were legal, it took off.  TV soon added direct video and audio inputs, making the sound and pictures must better. Soon, there would be Super-VHS and a special TV input for that.
 
Also at about 1980, Video Laser Discs were released.  They first used “analog” sound, then CD sound and they were the first to bring stereo into home movie viewing. Lasers also introduced the concept of “bonus” material, including commentary.  I think the first commentary I heard was on “War of the Roses.”

 
1985: TV shows begin broadcasting in stereo. I think the Tonight show as one of the first.
 
My next step up was the DVD, released 1995 or so.  It was still a 480i picture, but with better sound and video than tape.
 
The early 2000s began the slow evolution to HD TV, (1080i) it didn’t all happen at once, of course. In my neck of the woods, TV Broadcasting was first then cable TV.  Originally, the old fashioned TV big box were the first to have HD and home projectors were introduced. (I remember projectors had expensive upscaling devices that could be bought.) Soon the thin plasmas and LED and OLED took over. At the end of the first decade of the 21st century, Blue Ray technology, 1080P, had been introduced. Of course now we have 4k.
 
Home video, TV is just 80 years old.  While technological advances now come much quicker, we should realize that we are actually at the beginning of this technology, not at its end.
 
 
 
 
 


Krell 707 3D; Krell 400e (center) 600e; S-1500 (rear); Panasonic 9000 4k player; Revel speakers: Salon 2, Voice 2; W990; SVS subs SB-13 Ultras; JVC DLA-RS3000; Stuart StudioTek100; Krell Cipher; Day Sequerra FM Reference: VPI 19 Mark 4 & SME 309 & Audioquest 404i & Krell KPE

Re: TV: From the 1950s to today
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2019, 12:49:30 PM »
Barry,

DVD was released in 1997. HDTV was actually slightly before in 1996 when the first HDTV signal was broadcast in North Carolina, but HDTV tv sets didn't start appearing until 1998. Wide adoption happened around 2000 or so (at least in my area). I still have the antenna mounted to my chimney that I used to receive HDTV broadcasts since Comcast didn't have them at that time (they came about 4 years later in 2004 or 2005). We live in innovative times with definitely first world problems. Think of about 100 years ago or so when the greatest invention to man was the indoor toilet! :)
Blu-ray Reviewer / Technical Writer
Sound & Vision Magazine

Barry

  • *****
  • 287
Re: TV: From the 1950s to today
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2019, 01:07:44 PM »

 I was doing it from memory AND when I got it. There is a sad story here on why I did not get HD broadcasting to about 2003 or 4.  All the stations had set up their equipment and were to begin broadcasting HD fully, by October or November, 2001 for New York.  Then came 9/11 2001 and the World Trade Center was destroyed. It took a few years to get back up to speed and I do believe some technical  things have not yet been completed
 
  And I still have my antenna, for the same reason you do! Actually I have two, one is for FM reception. (see upper left)
 


Krell 707 3D; Krell 400e (center) 600e; S-1500 (rear); Panasonic 9000 4k player; Revel speakers: Salon 2, Voice 2; W990; SVS subs SB-13 Ultras; JVC DLA-RS3000; Stuart StudioTek100; Krell Cipher; Day Sequerra FM Reference: VPI 19 Mark 4 & SME 309 & Audioquest 404i & Krell KPE

Re: TV: From the 1950s to today
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2019, 02:14:50 PM »
I actually use my antenna for FM radio as well and no longer HDTV. Funny thing...I don't really use the FM either now that it's so easy to stream stations!
Blu-ray Reviewer / Technical Writer
Sound & Vision Magazine

Barry

  • *****
  • 287
Re: TV: From the 1950s to today
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2019, 02:22:26 PM »
Me too. I want to sell my FM tuner, a Day Sequerra Reference!
Krell 707 3D; Krell 400e (center) 600e; S-1500 (rear); Panasonic 9000 4k player; Revel speakers: Salon 2, Voice 2; W990; SVS subs SB-13 Ultras; JVC DLA-RS3000; Stuart StudioTek100; Krell Cipher; Day Sequerra FM Reference: VPI 19 Mark 4 & SME 309 & Audioquest 404i & Krell KPE

  Go Up
 

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2020, SimplePortal